Post Delivery FAQ

Creaking noises

If you hear a creaking noise from your furniture this is completely normal. Your new sofa has a wooden frame, made from strong, durable timber that, like leather, is a natural product and therefore has its own characteristics. The dowels and joints moving is the cause and whilst it may sound like something is wrong, it's not something that should be repaired or needs support.

The finished frame needs to be strong, yet flexible to work with your sofa’s suspension system. This flexibility can cause creaking or squeaking as it flexes. New furniture can creak as it beds in. Over time, with normal use, the surface becomes smooth and the creaking will reduce. Creaking is not a sign of a fault, simply a feature of authentic timber. Your product will settle over time and, as it does, the creaking will stop.

 

Fabric not folded properly

We use traditional methods when button tufting our sofas. This means the material around every button has been folded by hand and not sewn together. If the material is sewn together, it will lead to unsightly tears as the fabric is pulled apart when the sofa is in use. During the delivery of your sofa the fabric might be pulled out of place. Please inspect your sofa all over and re-fold the affected areas back into place.

 

Uneven feet

As mentioned above, the sofa frame needs to be strong yet flexible. During the delivery some sofas may have been placed into the truck at an angle or they may have been pulled or pushed from one corner. This may result in one or two legs not completely sitting on the ground.

This is normal. Carry on using the sofa, especially on the affected side, and the frame eventually retains it's original position. You can also lift the opposite side off the ground while simultaneously pushing the affected side down gently towards the floor. Doing this several times will allow the frame to settle quicker over time.

 

Uneven cushion piping

Once again, during delivery the cushions may have been pulled and the piping may need to be realigned. Simply use two fingers to run across the piping, pulling slightly if necessary, to get it back in line.